2017 Seasonal Searun Fisheries Technician

The Downeast Salmon Federation (DSF) is expanding its role as a co-manager of Eastern Maine’s smelt and river herring fisheries. We are seeking a temporary full time fisheries technician to help with seasonal field monitoring. DSF works with the Department of Marine Resources and numerous communities from the Bagaduce River to the St. Criox. The technician will work alongside other DSF staffers and with citizen science volunteers, operate state of the art fish counting equipment, manage and analyze data, and travel daily to monitoring sites throughout Downeast Maine.

The technician’s daily roles will include:

• managing the operation of an electronic and/or video counter on the Pennamaquan, East Machias, and Dennys Rivers
• reviewing underwater video files
• sampling river herring and smelt
• visually counting river herring and smelt
• assisting volunteers

Other roles include:

• support for partner organizations—The Downeast Fisheries Partnership, Alewife Harvesters of Maine
• staffing DSF outreach events

Applicant is/has:

• experienced in field biology with(or seeking) an applicable degree
• comfortable working in the outdoors during unpredictable spring weather
• a valid driver’s license and reliable vehicle
• able to work with a diverse group of partners
• comfortable presenting their work to the public and school groups
• a basic mechanical/technical competency
• strong data management skills
• social media skills that can be used to coordinate volunteers and for general outreach
• free to work some weekends and early mornings

Training for the positions begins April 10th. 10 weeks—40 hours week.

The technician will be based out of our Columbia Falls or East Machias office.

Please send resume, cover letter, and three references to brett@mainesalmonrivers.org

The Downeast Salmon Federation is an equal opportunity employer.

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